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10 Best Practices to Improve Your Business Etiquette

Many people use their notary public commission to start a business. Whether this is your full-time job or your part time, extra gig having the appropriate business etiquette could make or break you.  Here’s a list of the top 10 best business practices to ensure you stand out-- for the right reasons. 10 best pratices to improve your business etiquette  
  1. Say your full name.
When you introduce yourself to someone, say your full name. It holds more authority and makes it easier to identity you. For instance, my name is Jessica. I’m sure there’s hundreds of other certified notaries named Jessica, but my clients will be able to identity with me when I add my last name. All of my advertisements and my reviews contain my full name, so why not ensure they know exactly who they are meeting? Furthermore, your full name allows recognition and identification, it will also help people remember you.  
  1. Make eye contact.
This should be an all-day inclusion, not just in business transactions; but it is especially important in business endeavors to hold eye contact. People trust individuals who make eye contact more, and when you are notarizing sensitive, life-changing documents for these individuals, they want to trust you.   3.  Smile It is a natural reaction to smile back when someone smiles at you, and you instantly feel more comfortable and at ease with that person. A smile eases the tension and demonstrates you’re a nice person, too.  
  1. Firm hand shake.
We still judge people off of their handshakes. A firm handshake radiates authority and confidence. Two things which are never harmful in a business environment.  
  1. Stand when meeting someone.
When you meet someone, it does not matter where, you should stand when you are greeting them. Partner this with the above four for a rememberable first meeting.   The first five points all refer to the basics. Think about when you are first meeting someone, especially someone you are thinking about doing business with, how do you judge them? First impressions are key.  
  1. Handwritten thank-you notes
In our age of technology, handwritten anything has become an anomaly. Be the person that stands out by writing personalized thank-you notes to clients or business associates.  
  1. Have your business contact information ready.
Having a business card ready is never a bad idea. You want this for many reasons. The tangible makes it more likely they will follow up with you, and it is easier for them to refer you to their friends if they have your information literally on hand. If you do not have a business card, that’s ok, just make sure you aren’t giving them an unprofessional email or an email you never check.
  1. Know how and when you to leave.
Sometimes the exit is the hardest part. The client is extremely nice and chatty, but you have another signing in twenty minutes you need to leave for, how do you extract yourself from the situation? Do so kindly, and not abruptly. Try to have an exit line, such as, “it was great meeting you and I hope you’ll keep me in mind for your future signings,” and deliver the “line” when you are talking, not when the client is speaking, it makes it less awkward.  
  1. Keep your office or personal space professional.
We spend more time at the office than anywhere else most weeks, so of course, we want to personalize either our home office or our work offices. Adding some pizazz and some personality is not forbidden, but also question what your decorations will look like from a stranger’s point-of-view before you add anything.   10. Think before responding. It’s easy to get frustrated with a client or a co-worker, and social media is an easy outlet these days, but before you post anything, remember the rant or the comment only reflects back on you; your future clients can see all of those posts. In business, there will usually be someone you do not get along with, but do not let it impact your success, and approach it with a professional attitude. Business etiquette is crucial no matter what business you are in, but in an industry where word of mouth and having the right contacts can make or break you, why not have impeccable meetings?