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Notary Blog

New Alabama Law Changes Marriage Requirements

Effective August 29, 2019, the State of Alabama abolished all requirements for persons wishing to marry to obtain a marriage license.  The requirement of a ceremony to legally solemnize marriage vows is also abolished.

Persons wishing to legally marry in Alabama will now do so by completing and submitting an affidavit and forms specified in state law.

Alabama Notaries Public may perform the notarization for a couple's marriage affidavit and charge the allowed fee for the notarial act.  They may also provide additional, non-notarial services related to wedding planning and presiding over a ceremony to celebrate the marriage.  Fees for any such additional, non-notarial services should be charged separately from fees for notarizing the affidavit of marriage.

Because Alabama's statute naming individuals authorized to solemnize marriages has not been repealed, we recommend that Notaries not represent themselves as marriage "officiants" unless they are also a person named in Code of Alabama Sec. 30-1-7(a)-(c).

 

 

Our Sustainability Efforts at Notary Public Underwriters

Our company, Notary Public Underwriters, Inc., was featured in an article in the Tallahassee Democrat showcasing our green business model.

At NPU, we are fully committed to reducing our carbon footprint and building a sustainable earth. Our efforts include:

• 3 on-site rain gardens to prevent precious downstream water from being polluted an soil from eroding.

• Recycling paper, cardboard, aluminum, light bulbs, batteries, cell phones, ink cartridges and computer components.

• Our recycling efforts save 13 tons of paper, 560 pounds of aluminum and 6 tons of cardboard from entering a landfill each year!

• Use of biodegradable packing peanuts in shipping over 60,000 products each year.

• Implemented a vast array of energy efficient and sustainable technologies such as roof-top solar panels, LED lighting, auto on/off light switches in the bathrooms, and much more.

You can read the Tallahassee Democrat's article about our sustainable business model by clicking here.

UPDATE: Since this article was written we have had two months of zero energy usage (zero kWh’s) and expect to have many more. NPU is being completely powered with sunshine! Best of all, our energy saving efforts have not resulted in a single penny of cost being passed along to our customers!

I accidentally let my Florida notary commission expire, but I’ve submitted renewal paperwork. Can I notarize a document?

No. Once your notary commission expires you cannot perform any notarial duties.

According to Florida Statute 117.05(7), “Any person who acts as or otherwise willfully impersonates a notary public while not lawfully appointed and commissioned to perform notarial acts is guilty of a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s.775.083”.

You can resume performing notarizations once you receive confirmation of your renewed notary commission.

The best course of action is to make sure you apply for your notary renewal at least 4 months prior to your expiration date. This allows ample time for processing and ensures there will not be a lapse in service.

 If you would like to further discuss your Florida notary renewal application and the requirements to complete a Florida notary renewal, please call us, Notary Public Underwriters, your Florida notary bonding agency. We are always happy to help you navigate the Florida notary application process. You can reach our Florida notary service department at (800) 821-0821.

All Idaho Notaries Must Use the New Stamp Format Effective October 1, 2018

Idaho’s Secretary of State has reviewed previously-issued guidance, and now clarifies that allIdaho Notaries Public must, effective October 1, 2018, use an official stamp that conforms to new requirements enacted by the 2017 Idaho Legislature. This is regardless of a notary’s current status or commission expiration date.

Beginning October 1, notary stamp requirements are amended to include the Notary’s state-issued commission number and explicitly allow a commission expiration date; conform to maximum dimensions for rectangular and round stamps; and be “readily visible” when photocopied.

As an Idaho Notary, you must feel confident that on October 1, your official stamp includes all mandated information, nothing else unless it is allowed, and meets requirements for size and photocopied quality. In fact, you cannot notarize on or after October 1 unless you have your new stamp in hand—no matter how urgently your employer or customers need your notarial services. 

To have a smooth transition from your old stamp format to your new one and avoid disruptions in your notarial duties, we recommend ordering your new notary stamp today.

Steps to Compliance

  • Purchase a new stamp well in advance of October 1, 2018 to prevent a lapse in your notarial duties. Remember to safely secure the new stamp.
  • Continue to use your existing stamp through September 30, 2018.
  • On October 1, 2018, begin using the new stamp that meets the new requirements. Remember, as of this date, all notarial acts MUST be performed with the new stamp to be in compliance with the law.
  • After October 1, 2018, you are responsible for destroying your old notary stamp so it is no longer usable.

Let Notary Public Underwriters ease your worries about the approaching October 1 deadline. Our Idaho notary public stamps meet all requirements of law, come in a wide range of stamp case colors, and are meticulously produced by long-time employees whose craftsmanship is backed by our lifetime guarantee on every stamp.

Visit the Idaho Notary Supplies section of our website to purchase your Idaho notary stamp that complies with the October 1 format requirements. If you have any questions regarding the law change or notary products, contact our Customer Care Team at 800.826.2936 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Can I transfer my Florida notary commission to another state?

You are currently a Florida notary who will be relocating to another state soon and would like to continue working as a notary in the new state. Can you transfer your Florida notary commission to the new state of residence?

The answer is no. Pursuant to Section 117.01(5)(b), Florida Statutes, if you move out of state and change your legal residence, you must resign your notary public commission. You can then apply to become a notary in your new state of residence.

Steps to resigning your Florida notary commission:

  1. Send a signed letter of resignation to the Governor and return your certificate of notary public commission to:Executive Office of the Governor, Notary Section, The Capitol, Suite 209, 400 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001. You may use Appendix B of the Governor's Manual for the resignation form.

  2. Destroy your official notary public seal of office, unless the Governor requests its return.

If you would like to further help in resigning your Florida notary commission, please call us, Notary Public Underwriters, your Florida notary bonding agency. We are always happy to help you navigate the Florida notary process. You can reach our Florida notary service department at (800) 821-0821.